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Road Frames

Pinarello 2017 Pinarello Dogma F10 Frameset
$4,999.99 $5,949.99 16% Off
Pinarello never rests on its laurels. It’s a secret to their success and the why to the F10. The F8 that won the 2016 Tour de France and some 90 pro races is a great bike, but Pinarello knew they could do better. They started with the F8, crossed it with their Bolide time trial machine, went to the wind tunnel for road-specific shaping, used computer design to maximize carbon-ply placement, and the result is impressive. The F10 is the fruit of the ‘same, but better’ approach Pinarello has been using. They knew the F8 geometry was dialed, so they could leave that. Pinarello takes pride in their balanced ride, and see that as a defining characteristic of their frames. They knew they wanted the frame to be lighter, stiffer, and more aero. So they analyzed the layup to figure out how to get more lateral stiffness with less material, and they analyzed the aerodynamics to figure out how to cut through the wind faster. And they had to reconcile the two so that the aero shaping helped improve stiffness while reducing weight. With aerodynamics, they decided to focus on practical matters. Namely, making sure the bike was more aero with two bottles sitting in the main triangle. Improving the airflow around the bottles was the most important key to reducing drag. You’ll notice that the fork crown still nestles in a notch between the down and head tubes. And if you take a look at the fork tips, you’ll see extended material behind the tips. These are “fork flaps” in Pinarello jargon, and they smooth out airflow on the trailing edge of the tips. Below the fork, the downtube dramatically changes shape just where the top of the downtube bottle rests. The new shape shields not only the downtube bottle, but the seat tube bottle if it’s run on the lower mounting point (there are three bosses in the seat tube, use the lower two for this aero advantage). The result of the shaping work is that the area around the bottles is 12.6% more aerodynamic. Less dramatic but still important is the shaping around the head tube and the underside of the top tube. These are designed to smooth flow as well. Pinarello is also known for their asymmetric designs. For them, that means slightly off-setting and re-shaping frame tubes so the frame is better able to resist torsional forces created by pedaling. The results are subtle enough not to see in pictures, but are obvious to the eye in person. The downtube is offset to the right, while the seat tube offset to the right, and even the stays are moved in that direction as well. Visually, the asymmetry of the seat stay yoke is surprising, but elegantly subtle. Weight is one of those features that at the pro level is vital, yet limited as a result of minimum weight standards. The F10 is 55g lighter than the F8 in the 53 size. A drop of 6.29%. When Team Sky takes these bikes on the road, they need to add weight. You can take advantage of it, and should. Aero bikes often lack lateral stiffness. The shaping often places material in the wrong places to maximize the rigidity in this plane. Pinarello actually made the F10 stiffer than the F9. The tapered 1 1/8” to 1 1/2” steerer increases lateral stiffness at the fork. The improved shaping and new asymmetries increase lateral stiffness at the bottom bracket. The result is 7% stiffer overall. Pinarello keeps the frame aero by running cables, housing, wiring internally. If you run Shimano’s latest Di2, your E-Link can be accessible through a port in the downtube above the bottle-no need for a mount under your stem. All the necessary stops and plugs are included. The battery, if you go electronic with Di2 or Campagnolo EPS, goes in the seatpost. The included aero seatpost itself is 350mm long, with a 25mm setback. The clamp can work with oval or round rails-make sure to heed the torque rating marked on the post. The post is secured to the frame as aerodynamically as possible, with two bolts behind the seat tube, called Twin Force Closure. The frameset comes with headset, top cap and spacers. There are round and aero options. In both cases, there’s a 15mm top cap, two 10mm spacers, and one 5mm spacers. The aero option is designed to work with Pinarello’s MoST stem and/or integrated bar/stem combo. The bottom bracket keeps to Pinarello’s preference, Italian-threaded. Maximum tire width is 25mm. The Pinarello F10 is excessive in the ways a WorldTour bike should be, more of everything needed, less of everything not essential.
Pinarello 2019 Pinarello Dogma F10 Disk Frameset Diamond
$5,999.99
Pinarello's Dogma is already proven to be an instant classic. It builds up bikes that are just as capable during a 3-week stage race as in a one-day monument; light enough for the climbers, stiff enough for the sprinters, and aero enough for the roulers and puncheurs. The palmarès speak volumes to how versatile the frameset is and its aided by the fact that World Tour Juggernaut Team Sky, has a well versed and diverse squad that is well known to place a huge emphasis on marginal gains. As its long-standing frame sponsor, Pinarello is responsible for providing the material which allowed the team the advantages necessary to be on the top of the 2018 UCI World Tour Team rankings. Pinarello didn't have to do too much with the already excellent Dogma F8 when redesigning the Dogma F10 in 2017. But for Sky, any improvement as well, an improvement, and the opportunity to push the limits of frame design doesn't hurt in Team Sky's quest for global domination. In light of the success that it's already enjoyed, we're not surprised to see the F10 return for an encore with little change. The only significant difference is purely aesthetic, with Pinarello dialing in some graphical flair to set the model years apart. As with its predecessor, the latest Dogma F10's geometry and material composition are similar to the F8, but the F10 features a few subtle tweaks that result in some claims that, given the impressive gains the F8 made over the Dogma 65.1, are almost comically impressive: 7% more stiffness and 6.3% less weight. We can only assume that, in the next few years, those numbers will add up to another trip (or two) to the top step of that podium. Since this is the new flagship model of one of the industry's most storied bike brands and one of the sport's most dominant teams, the Dogma F10 warrants healthy consideration. We'll cover the details at length below, but any bike is ultimately defined by its ride, so it makes sense to start there. Featherweight frames are often, well, feathery, but the F10 meets pedal strokes with buoyant solidity. When spinning up out of corners, punching it on Ardennes-esque walls, or turning the screws ever tighter on climbs, the F10's bottom bracket exhibits the stability—but definitely not the weight—of a cinderblock, transforming frantic, stop-and-start pedal inputs into weightless, floating propulsion. Even while accelerating to sprint speeds or red-lining a double-digit gradient, the frame's efficiency eliminates dead spots between pedal strokes. At times, the F10's tapered head tube and oversized tubing make it feel like a sentient animal that's driving itself forward, an eager urgency that means it also responds best to a firm hand and a vigilante captain at its helm, especially while forcing the issue on a high-speed descent. And while our abilities only let us test a bike's mettle so far, the F10's carry-over geometry—almost an exact replica of the F8—means that we've essentially already seen it smash the most talented fields to pieces on cycling's biggest stages. During its tenure, the Dogma F8 piloted Sky's talented cast of riders to 90 wins and many more podium appearances. Froome's two consecutive Tour wins are the low-hanging fruit here, but it's impossible to understand the breadth of the F8's abilities without recalling Stannard's surgical dismantling of Etixx-QuickStep at 2015's Omloop. That's a race for the hard men, not the pencil neck climbers, and the F8 proved equal to the race's cobblestones, the finishing sprint, and the dangerous twitchiness that typically defines one-day classics. It's safe to say that most grand tour climbing bikes would wilt under those conditions; the F8 just shines brighter. The F8 also won a quiver-full of BOTY awards, which is nice, but we're admittedly much more impressed by its ability to deliver in conditions ranging from Stannard's gutsy win to Froome's high-mountain escapades. Those are big shoes to fill, and we'd normally be wary of tweaking such an effective formula. But we're reassured by the fact that Pinarello is still using the Froomes and Kwiatkowski's of Sky as its field testers. In fact, Froome himself was the frame's first in-depth tester. His immediate, unfiltered feedback was typical of the Briton's amicable reticence: "great work, guys!" He went on to provide the kind of detailed notes you'd expect from a rider of his caliber, but—frankly—the frame's eagerness while snapping up to speed or diving into corners leaves no room for initial considerations other than how much-damned fun it is to ride. Through rider feedback like that, the partnership with Sky informed the F10's extensive list of updates. The partnership has been extended to 2020, which means there are likely already new projects in the works (in fact, Pinarello assures us that's the case); however, given the enormity of the above claims and this latest Dogma's indescribably animated ride quality, we're looking forward to spending the next seve
Pinarello Pinarello Dogma F8 Disc Frameset
$3,199.99 $5,749.99 44% Off
The directive from Team Sky was simple: 'the same, but faster.' That was the spark that led to the Pinarello Dogma F8. The Dogma 65.1, the bike that won just about all there was to win in 2013, wasn't good enough for them. As a team, the most fearsom Grand Tour squad on the planet, they look for gains wherever they can be found, and hope that if they improve everything, even if it's just a little bit here and there, it will add up to real, race-winning differences. 'Same, but faster' could be confounding to a company that prides itself on making bikes for the best in the world and an incredible success record over the years. But Pinarello embraced the challenge. Sky sweetened the pot by enlisting their sponsor Jaguar Land Rover, which provides not only cars to the team but wind-tunnel expertise. Pinarello decided to keep the 65.1's geometry, which has been proven over the years, and is the foundation for a great ride. Everything else was on the table. Jaguar helped design the tube shapes, finding what worked, and what worked better. Just about every frame tube was tweaked in some fashion. The fork legs splay out a bit wider for better aerodynamics. The fork crown helps smooth the airflow around the front brake. The head tube has a more pronounced nose, though still within the UCI's 3:1 ratio. The top tube was flattened. The down tube and seat tube and seat post were changed to what Pinarello is calling a "flatback profile." It's a truncated airfoil that tricks the wind into thinking the tube is longer than it is. The seat stay attaches to the seat tube at a lower point, and the monostay top is shaped to shroud the rear brake. The seat post clamp was integrated into the frame and the fixing mechanism hidden from the wind. Even the enormously popular Onda wavy stays and fork have been refined to simpler, more aero curves. Bottle cage placement was even investigated. The result is 3Xair bolts on the seat tube. There are cage bolts. Use the middle and lower for better aerodynamics and better weight positioning. Use the upper and middle if you want to reach the bottle easier. The shaping wasn't the only change. The shapes have a second purpose; increasing rigidity to improve pedaling efficiency. In many cases, the new shapes meant less material and structures better able to resist torsional forces. The carbon lay-up had been modified as well. Highlighting the changes is Pinarello's use of Torayca's T1100 1K carbon, which helps reduce weight and increase stiffness further. The improvements continue beyond the realm of the theoretical to the practical. Knowing that some riders utilizing electronic shifting like to slam their stems, the top of the head tube has been re shaped to better accommodate electronic junction boxes. The Think2 mechanical/electronic internal routing has been kept, with smoother refinement of the ports, including an exit port on the right rear dropout. If the bike is set up for electronics, the battery hides from the wind in the seat post. The front derailleur hanger is removable. This is both in case it gets damaged and for people looking to lighten their ride as much as possible if they're setting up for a demanding hill climb. After all these improvements, the question should be, "is it faster?" The answer is a resounding "yes." The frameset is 120g lighter in the 54cm size. It measures 12% stiffer overall, with 47% less aerodynamic impact. The fork works as a sail in certain wind conditions. The frame and fork together have 47% less drag than the previous Dogma, and come close to Pinarello's Bolide time trial frame. It's also 16% more balanced. Balanced. Remember Pinarello's embrace of asymmetry? It is still present, but more refined. As a result, the asymmetries they build in better counteract the pedaling forces on the frame. And out on the road, the bike provides a more lively ride. As with earlier Dogma's, the F8 comes with a tapered 1-1/8" to 1-1/2" steerer. The bottom bracket is Italian-threaded. The included seat post is 300mm long and is secured via two 2.5mm Allen-head bolts behind the frame. It can be packed with Shimano's Di2 internal battery, Campagnolo's EPS V2 battery, or left empty. The dropouts are carbon-fiber for light weight. The Pinarello Dogma F8, eighth revision of the Dogma from Fausto Pinarello, is a climbing bike, an aero bike, a bike that goes beyond one that already accrued 65 WorldTour victories.
Pinarello Dogma F10 Disc Frameset
$5,999.00
Unparalleled speed, world-class aerodynamics, and Italian elegance combine to form Pinarello's Dogma F10 Frameset. The featherweight carbon construction, incredible power transfer, and ultra-responsive handling result in an otherworldly ride. From Pinarello's super high-end Torayca T1100 1K carbon, to the asymmetry of the chainstays, to the concave downtube shape taken from the Bolide TT, everything on the Dogma F10 is crafted for aero speed. A seamlessly integrated tapered head tube housing Pinarello's voluptuous Wave F10 carbon fork provides laser-like steering control while reducing wind resistance and weight. If using an electronic drivetrain, the Think2 System with E-Link allows you to integrate the electronic shifting controls directly into the downtube for an extremely clean setup. Additionally, the flat mount disc brakes provide supreme braking power in an extremely light, streamlined package.
Pinarello Dogma F10 Frameset
$5,999.00
Unparalleled speed, world-class aerodynamics, and Italian elegance combine to form Pinarello's Dogma F10 Frameset. The featherweight carbon construction, incredible power transfer, and ultra-responsive handling result in an otherworldly ride. From Pinarello's super high-end Torayca T1100 1K carbon, to the asymmetry of the chainstays, to the concave downtube shape taken from the Bolide TT, everything on the Dogma F10 is crafted for aero speed. A seamlessly integrated tapered head tube housing Pinarello's voluptuous Wave F10 carbon fork provides laser-like steering control while reducing wind resistance and weight. Plus, if using an electronic drivetrain, the Think2 System with E-Link allows you to integrate the electronic shifting controls directly into the downtube for an extremely clean setup.
Pinarello Dogma F10 Frameset
$5,999.00
Unparalleled speed, world-class aerodynamics, and Italian elegance combine to form Pinarello's Dogma F10 Frameset. The featherweight carbon construction, incredible power transfer, and ultra-responsive handling result in an otherworldly ride. From Pinarello's super high-end Torayca T1100 1K carbon, to the asymmetry of the chainstays, to the concave downtube shape taken from the Bolide TT, everything on the Dogma F10 is crafted for aero speed. A seamlessly integrated tapered head tube housing Pinarello's voluptuous Onda carbon fork provides laser-like steering control while reducing wind resistance and weight. And, the sleek aerodynamic internal cable routing allows you to run either electronic or mechanical shifting systems, with interchangeable cable stops for Campagnolo, Shimano, or SRAM components.
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